GameFans app now has a dark theme!

GameFans app has been praised by Android enthusiasts for bringing them the latest news from multiple gaming news outlets without the duplicates they might find elsewhere. Since we launched the app last summer we’ve taken care to keep it fast and up-to-date, in addition to adding new features like notifications and tags. Today, we’re bringing another much-requested feature: a dark theme!

gamefans-dark-theme

Enabling the dark theme is incredibly simple, just follow the instructions we’ve listed below:

  • Tap hamburger menu to open left menu
  • Tap “Settings”
  • Tap “Theme”
  • Tap “Dark”

Once enabled, the theme will change from a vibrant white to a dark black, protecting your eyes in dark environments, keeping your loved ones asleep during late browsing, and conserving precious battery life! You can download the latest version of the GameFans app from the Google Play Store. Let us know how you like the dark theme in the comments below!

The update also improves stability and performance as well as squashed some pesky bugs.

What features would you like to see in future updates?

DOWNLOAD GAMEFANS

Boogie2988, real name Steven Williams, is famous for his rage moments. This video, in particular, is probably one of his more popular ones. Here, we have Francis getting incredibly angry after his World of Warcraft (WoW) account is hacked, and as you’ll see, WoW is a small theme in this article.

Never cancel someone’s account

And another one for WoW. This time, the choreographed freakout is because the kid’s mother cancelled his account. If we’re being honest, we’d be pretty PO’ed too if hundreds of hours of work went down the drain when we had a raid next week. Nevertheless, watch the video and listen to the sweet guttural noises he makes while flailing around on his bed.

You’re separating the family

Here’s a freakout that probably spawned the countless numbers of audio freakouts that were popular during the early 2,000s. In this speaker-busting video, poor James just wants to finish his next WoW session (possibly a raid). Problem is, he doesn’t know how long the next match will take since he’s never done it before. Mom’s not having any of that. She (and eventually dad) will do whatever it takes to get James off the computer.

The keyboard smasher

Another classic, this freakout is caused by Unreal Tournament! In the video above, one German kid yells, curses, and smashes his way to victory after Unreal Tournament 2004 won’t load.

Nintendo 64!!!!

What’s the best thing about being a parent on Christmas Day? Why, seeing your kid’s smiling face after they get the present they wanted! In this throwback video, Brandon Kuzma, age 9 at the time, opened a box one Christmas morning in 1998 to find none other than the Nintendo 64. He reacted just as any of us did when we got our first gaming system: by screaming in delight.

Brandon and his sister Rachel (who’s also featured in the video), are all grown up now. You can read more about them in this article by Mashable.

 

As funny as some of these are, I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t in some pretty similar situations during my youth. After all, that’s just a part of growing up, right? If you have a rage moment or two you’d like to share, let us know in the comments below.

easter-egg-2

Easter eggs can sometimes be the best part of a video game. Finding something special that the developer took extra time to hide is oftentimes rewarding, and creepy. So, we gathered up a list of some of the six easter eggs we thought were worth finding.

Creepy AF mannequins

If you’ve played Call of Duty: Black Ops 3, you’ve probably noticed the creepy mannequins that are peppered around the Nuketown map. While they set the eerie tone pretty well, shooting off their heads or their arms within the first two minutes of a match elevates the creepy factor tenfold.

If you go the head route, once you’ve popped off the head of each mannequin, they’ll spring to life and come after you, presumably because now they can’t get a role in a Mannequin remake.

Now, if you shoot off their arms, nothing appears to happen at first…until you turn your back. Once you turn to face them again, you’ll notice they’ve moved a bit. The manneuquins will continue to advance toward you, so long as you’re not staring at them. Maybe they’re camera shy or watch a lot of Doctor Who? Who knows.

The sarcastic announcer

This is a slightly depressing revelation. Remember how chipper and encouraging the announcer for Wave Race: Blue Storm was? “You won the race man, way to go,” was just one of the things he spoutted should you actually win a race. It was a nice pick-me-up we don’t really see in games all too much. That completely changes if you enter a cheat code.

If you enter a cheat in the audio settings found in the options menu, you’ll unlock another, less enthralling announcer. This guy sounds like he’s had enough of life and is ready to quit his job at a moment’s notice. Seriously, listen to the video above and take in his monotone delivery, apathetic advice, and overall depressing attitude. He’s a jerk, but a game-changing easter egg.

Save the universe, one seal at a time

Here’s an easter egg that’s sure to make you smile. In Splinter Cell: Double Agent, there’s a secret mission only accessible if you’re playing with a buddy in co-op. This easter egg, discovered in 2010, sees you and your friend saving these adorable baby seals. They’re also from outer space, because why not? This mission tasks you with finding coins, feeding the seals, and saving the entire universe. The easter egg concludes with the princess seal emerging from the ceiling, adorned in a beam of light, as she thanks you and leaves.

The crowd is the key

And finally, a double-dose of easter eggs that weren’t discovered for more than 20 years.

The first of these is some much-needed advice for beating Piston Honda in Mike Tyson’s Punch-Out!! On April 8, 2016, YouTuber midwesternhousewives discovered a way to make the fight with Honda far more predictable. While making your way through the World Circuit, you’ll come across a rematch with Honda. Here, he unleashes a flurry of hits that can be countered if you’re quick. Normally, you’d need luck, but if you look at the bearded spectator in the front of the audience, his nods and ducks will inform you of the exact moment you can counter Honda’s move.

Similarly, in your first fight with Bald Bull if you look at the crowd and see someone take a picture with a flash, you can deliver a knock-out blow to Bald Bull. That’s a piece of advice from 2009 given by the late Satoru Iwata.

Did you think of an easter egg we didn’t put on this list? Let us know so we can feature it in a future article!

ps4-pro-and-slim

It’s finally official. After months of speculation, rumors, and some teasing, Sony has not only announced the PS4 Pro, but also the PS4 Slim. Ok, the Slim has been leaked for a while, but it’s nice to have an official announcement. Here’s everything you need to know about the two newest consoles in the PlayStation family. We’ve also included images of the new PlayStation Platinum Headset (which is wireless and supports 7.1 surround sound and 3D audio) and redesigned PlayStation Camera since they weren’t formally announced during the PlayStation Meeting.

PS4 Slim

ps4-slim

  • Launch (in most markets): September 15th
  • Price: $299/€299/£259/¥ 29,980
  • Will support HDR (high-dynamic range) following a firmware update to be delivered next week. The same applies to all current PS4 models dating back to the system’s launch in 2013.
  • The console is slimmer, lighter, and more energy-efficient
  • Slim will be the primary PS4 going forward, phasing out the original model.
  • Will house the same components in the current PS4.
  • Aimed at a wider audience, hence the slimmer profile and cheaper price point.
  • No optical output
  • No light bar
  • Power and Eject buttons on the front-left side of the console
  • Comes with a slightly-revised DualShock 4, featuring a see-through window, located at the top of the touchpad, for the light bar.

 

PS4 Pro

ps4-pro-console

  • Launch date: November 10th
  • Price: $399/€399/£399/¥ 44,980
  • Supports 4K resolution and HDR for a more realistic experience that’s closer to what you see in the real world
  • Will support 4K media streaming through upcoming Netflix and YouTube apps. By the year’s end, Netflix will have 600 hours of 4K content including Luke Cage and Narcos Season 2.
  • Won’t support 4K blu-rays
  • Will stand alongside and complement the PS4 Slim
  • Aimed at hardcore gamers and those who have high-resolution displays
  • Your PS4 discs, downloads, and controllers will work on PS4 Pro.
  • Sony is creating “one community” with between PS4 Pro and PS4 Slim as not to segregate the userbases.
  • Sony is working on a way to transfer your content from your regular PS4 to the PS4 Pro, easily.
  • Won’t blur the lines between console generations
  • 2x GPU power
  • Boosted clock rate on CPU
  • 1TB hard drive in all units
  • HDTV users will also benefit from the added power of the PS4 Pro with 1080p games and higher, more stable frame rate.
  • Over a half-dozen, first-party (and some third-party) patches for PS4 Pro support are in the works.
  • Existing PS4 games will support PS4 Pro’s extra power following patches by the developers.
  • Multiplayer games will run at the same frame rate on PS4 Pro and PS4 Slim.
  • Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare, Modern Warfare Remastered, and Black Ops 3 will all have PS4 Pro support on November 4th.
  • PlayStation VR games will look crisper and have higher frame rates.
  • There’s a USB port and optical output port in the back.
  • Will support 1080p Share Play and Remote Play
  • Will support 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz wifi

Current PS4 Pro supported games

  • Spider-Man
  • For Honor
  • Deus Ex: Mankind Divided
  • Rise of the Tomb Raider
  • Watch Dogs 2
  • Killing Floor 2
  • Uncharted 4: A Thief’s End
  • inFAMOUS First Light
  • Shadow of Mordor
  • Farpoint
  • Horizon Zero Dawn

  • Call of Duty Infinite Warfare

  • Call of Duty Modern Warfare Remastered
  • Call of Duty: Black Ops 3
  • Fifa 17
  • Battlefield 1
  • Dishonored 2
  • Final Fantasy XV
  • Mass Effect Andromeda

Exhibit A
Exhibit B
Exhibit C
Exhibit D
Exhibit E

How do I enable it?

Good question! The process is rather simple. Here’s everything you need:

  1. A phone
  2. A PSN account
  3. Internet

Simple things, but better to be thorough. Now setting up the feature can be slightly different depending on what method you choose. You can setup 2-step verification on your web browser of choice or PS4. Instructions for both processes can be found below:

WEB BROWSER:

  1. Navigate to the following link: https://www.playstation.com/en-us/account-security/2-step-verification/
  2. Sign into your PSN account
  3. Click “edit” next to “Inactive” under “Status”
  4.  On the next screen where it tells you how “To sign in with 2-step verification” click “Activate” at the bottom.
  5. Afterwards, when it tells you how to sign into your account on a PS Vita or PS3, click “continue”
  6. Enter the phone number you want verification codes to go to.
  7. At this point, you’ll receive a text message with the verification code. Enter that on the next screen and click “verify.”
  8. Now leave the field entitled “Sign out this account on all your other devices.” This will sign out of your PSN account on all non-PS4 devices. (We’re not sure why it skips the PS4). Afterwards, hit “ok.”
  9. Now you’re finished!

PS4:

  1. Turn on your console and sign into your profile.
  2. Go to “settings”
  3. Go to PlayStation Network/Account Management
  4. Go to Account Information
  5. Go to Security
  6. Sign into your PSN account
  7. Go to “Mobile Phones”
  8. Go to “Add Your Mobile Phone”
  9. Enter the verification code
  10. When it asks if you want to activate 2-step verification click “activate”
  11. Click Ok
  12. Afterwards, make sure it’s set to sign out of all devices the PSN account is logged into.
  13. Congratulations, you’re finished!

Once you have 2-step verification activated, anytime you wish to sign into a new device for the first time, you’ll be sent a verification code. If you’re signing into a PS Vita or PS3, you’ll be sent a password to enter in the password field instead.

Web Browser Gallery:

PS4 Gallery:

No Man’s Sky Review

No Man's Sky - Abandoned Outpost

That sense of solitude is part of what makes those first 30 minutes with the game so good. Knowing that you’re alone on this planet gives an eery feeling to it all. This is compounded by the fact that some outposts have been reclaimed by nature, with the systems inside barely running. Creepy moments like this made me want to explore the different planets that populate No Man’s Sky’s seemingly infinite galaxy. At least at first.

Not so unique

No Man’s Sky’s magic lasts only until you realize that what you’re seeing isn’t all that unique. Beyond those initial discoveries, everything starts to blend together. The crab-like creatures I saw on one planet began cropping up on other planets with slight design variations. In fact, I saw someone else with my exact same crab-like creature (on a completely different planet) on the internet. At that point, my experience was shattered because out of all the permutations that could be generated, I was seeing something that should have been a unique discovery on someone else’s adventure.

By the time I was finished with my first hour of No Man’s Sky, I was struggling to continue. Honestly, if I wasn’t doing this review, I probably would’ve stopped playing. The game is just too tedious. Your actions play out the exact same on each planet: mine resources, talk to an NPC, refill meters, and rocket off to the next planet.

No Man's Sky - Milestone

Nothing really feels like it has any meaning in No Man’s Sky. While exploring the galaxy, you’ll pass “milestones,” the in-game version of achievements. These milestones then take up almost the entire screen, removing any elements of the HUD. If you’re fighting a sentinel, say goodbye to the aiming reticle and any chance at not wasting ammo. Nothing about these milestones feels earned. I wasn’t quite sure why I should have cared about walking an arbitrary distance or earning 700,000 units when there wasn’t anything to show for it. Don’t get me wrong. Typically, I enjoy these moments of instant gratification. They’re fun for me. I like being rewarded for some made up accomplishment, because more often than not, it feels earned. Here, it doesn’t.

Even interactions with NPCs feel meaningless. Since you don’t know the three languages in the game, some of your time will be spent filling up your lexicon with the languages of the people. One word at a time. I was never able to fully grasp what anyone was saying, but it’s not like it mattered. No matter what the NPC might tell you, it doesn’t carry any weight on your journey. There was a part where I inadvertently agreed to marry one guy’s daughter or something. Did that come into play later in my travels? Of course not.

No Man's Sky - Extreme Weather

Planets feel very much the same. While using procedural generation as the building blocks of this game sounds good on paper, it doesn’t work well in practice. Despite weather conditions like acid rain, dust storms, or other hazardous elements of mother nature, after the first planet, you begin to realize that these planets are nothing more than palette swaps. That goes for the odd animals too. Very rarely was I impressed by an animal’s design to stop and stare at it for more than the time I needed to scan the creature into my database and earn a few units. The weather conditions and animals might change slightly from planet-to-planet, but never enough so that you approach each scenario in a different way.

Pointless upgrades

No Man’s Sky allows you to upgrade your weapons and ships, but you’ll be hard pressed finding a reason to do so since you never really feel like you have to. There’s no perceivable difference between ships or weapons. Despite some upgrades letting you mine faster or shoot quicker, you’re never placed in a scenario that necessitates these upgraded abilities. After obtaining my first new multi-tool, I was completely satisfied with its speed. Never did I want to allocate the limited inventory space to making it “faster” or “stronger.” The one thing that does feel necessary, though, is getting more inventory space.

No Man's Sky - Inventory Full

By default, No Man’s Sky starts you out with a pitifully low inventory space. Once you take into account the minerals you’re going to hold whenever you need to refill a meter, you’re left with barely enough space to do anything. For this reason, I spent more than an hour scavenging planets to add slots to my Exosuit. One slot at a time.

The worst part about No Man’s Sky is that there’s no story or real sense of urgency. While getting to the center of the galaxy might have been pegged as the overall goal, the game doesn’t explicitly tell you that until you go to your map and look at the path it charts. It just seems like an afterthought. In my 15 hours with the game, I wasn’t able to reach the center of the galaxy nor did I feel any reason to. So I looked it up online. I’m happy I didn’t use that as my driving force for this game.

No Man's Sky - Atlas Path

There is one thing in No Man’s Sky that slightly resembles a story. That’s the Atlas Path. Once you accept this mission from an orb you find on almost any planet, you’re able to travel down the aimless Atlas Path. This is supposed to get you closer to the center of the galaxy, but I never got the feeling that’s what I was doing. Instead, it seemed like I was just listening to my character string together sentences to sound deep and meaningful. They weren’t.

Conclusion

No Man’s Sky is a game that highly encourages the player to explore, but doesn’t provide them with the resources nor motivation to do so until they’ve sunk enough time to upgrade their inventory space. By that point, their drive to play this endless, repetitive, and disappointing game will likely have dissipated. Sean Murray and the team at Hello Games plan to update No Man’s Sky with base-building mechanics, but in its current state the game simply doesn’t have enough content to support its $60 price tag nor its near endless universe.

Pros
+ The universe is impressively large
+ Some of the planets are truly beautiful

Cons:
– The game is devoid is content
– Actions feel meaningful
– Ending doesn’t come close to being worth the investment
– Unbelievably repetitive
– Planets and animals feel the same
– Starved for inventory space for a long time
– No sign of promised multiplayer
– Survival elements kill any remaining desire to explore

Final Score

Score: 4/10

His mind is so blown he has no answer to the question, is it possible for other players to see each other in the game? His Twitter feed still doesn’t contain the answer to that question, but shortly before the launch of the game on PS4, Murray did tweet this.

Except, the tweet that follows completely contradicts the statement that the game is not a multiplayer game. He seems to channel his inner Peter Molyneux to once again leave the question with an open-ended answer that could be interpreted in many different ways.

So which is it? Is the game multiplayer or not. Well, from my perspective Sean Murray’s definition of multiplayer and the definition of multiplayer that most of the community is using are not the same. To Sean Murray, the ability to name things and see things that other people have named is multiplayer. That’s the features and easter eggs he’s talking about in this tweet.

So is the game multiplayer? Yes, in the sense that you are in a shared universe of people that have named a bunch of stuff in a database on Hello Games’ servers. But is it co-op in that you can meet up with people in the world around you, like in Elite: Dangerous, EVE: Online, or any other MMORPG? No, it’s not.

At his best, Sean Murray had intended for multiplayer to be in the game as the game was evolving during the four years it had marketing. At his worst, he intentionally misled the gaming community with some of his statements by not clarifying his definition of multiplayer in interviews that were much closer to the time the game released.

GameFAQs forums outlined the process of getting the glasses in order to make it to the inverted castle.

You need to get the Silver Ring in the royal chapel in a hallway with spikes. You break the spikes with the spike breaker armor which is in the catacombs.

The Gold Ring you receive from the Succubus, which she is in a room on the right on the tower that if you fall straight down it would lead you to the underground caverns.

equip both rings while in the same room as the clock and it will open, wear them when fighting Richter.

nerve to complain about this one on the forums. Speaking of which…

5. Why won’t my Batman glide?

Batman-Arkham-Asylum-Gliding

Rocksteady went a similar route with Batman: Arkham Asylum, leading sticky-fingered thieves to out themselves as the pirates they are when posting on the Eidos forums for support. The game included code that checked whether the game was a legitimate copy or not. If it wasn’t, the glide move Batman can do in the game was severely gimped.

As you can see from one pirate’s post describing what he calls a “glitch.”

“I’ve got a problem when it’s time to use Batman’s glide in the game. When I hold “,” like it’s said to jump from one platform to another, Batman tries to open his wings again and again instead of gliding. So he fels down in a poisoning gas. If somebody could tel me, what should I do there.”

The real kicker here is this guy was seeking help in the game before the official PC version was even released. Here’s what a mod on the forums told him in the greatest mic-drop in piracy history.

“The problem you have encountered is a hook in the copy protection, to catch out people who try and download cracked versions of the game for free.

It’s not a bug in the game’s code, it’s a bug in your moral code.”

4. Remedy’s philosophy is act like a pirate, dress like a pirate.

remedy-alan-wake-pirate

Remedy Entertainment is fond of releasing story-driven games that are exclusive to Microsoft’s platforms. Both Alan Wake and Quantum Break contain an interesting approach for those who decided to sail the high seas in order to play them.

Immediately upon firing up cracked copies of both of these games, players were greeted by the main character wearing an eye patch that features the famous Jolly Roger symbol that either means you’re drinking poison or you’re a pirate.

remedy-quantum-break-pirate

3. Hey, why is my gun shooting a bunch of chickens?!

Crytek decided to have a lot of fun with people who pirated Crysis: Warhead by changing one fundamental element of the game. Players who downloaded a cracked version of the game soon discovered their guns stopped shooting bullets after a while and instead, nothing but squawking flocks of chickens emerged.

Chickens don’t do damage, so this made the cracked copy of the game unplayable.

2. Good luck seeing a pirated copy of the Sims 4.

sims-4-anti-piracy

With the release of The Sims 4, EA’s official forums began filling up with strange bug reports. People said that when their Sims got naked and the blur filter that the game uses to cover that is exposed, it spreads across the whole screen making the game unplayable.

What people thought was a bug that had slipped under EA’s radar was actually intentional. Only cracked copies of the game experienced the problem, so anyone complaining about the issue on the official forums once more outed themselves and their piracy.

1. And the winner of the cruelest anti-piracy code is… Nintendo?!

DCIM100MEDIA

You might think of Nintendo as a family-oriented company a lot like some sort of Japanese Disney. You’d be pretty fair in that assessment, but in Nintendo’s early days as a video game publisher, they didn’t mess around when it came to piracy.

Beloved SNES RPG Earthbound is loved for its quirky story and battle system, but it also has some of the most ruthless piracy deterrent code ever written. So what’s so devious about it?

Players trying to play a hacked cartridge or a cracked copy of the game would immediately be presented with a message about piracy. If that didn’t deter them, the game then subjected the player to an exponential increase in the amount of random encounters in the game.

For players that managed to tackle this challenge head on, the real f*&k you from Nintendo came when players made it to the final boss, Gigyas. During this final battle, cracked copies of the game freeze completely and then wipe all of your save data before forcing a console reset. You can’t say they didn’t warn you!

No Man's Sky - Mining

In simplest terms, No Man’s Sky is about gathering resources – whether that’s by mining in your ship or on a planet or purchasing them from a trading center – to upgrade your equipment and get to the center of the galaxy.

What’s trading like?

No Man's Sky - Trading

In one word: vapid. In more words, trading in No Man’s Sky entails going up to a small orb-like device or talking to a lonely NPC in an outpost. From here, you can scavange your multiple inventories to sell items you don’t want for money, or purchase things you do need. You can also purchase ships you see parked in space stations or trading outposts.

What about combat?

No Man's Sky - Combat

Combat is very easy. Simply point and shoot your multi-tool at a sentinel or animal, or your space ship’s artillery at an object in space. In terms of weaponry, on ground, you have two modes for your multi-tool: mining and weapon mode (our terms, not theirs). Mining uses your mining beam to fire a laser at an object, slowly whittling away their health. In weapon mode, you have access to a more traditional method of combat with basic machine gun fire. There’s also a secondary fire that shoots grenades at a target.

If you want to, you can upgrade your mini-tool so it shoots faster, bullets ricochet off objects, or has more ammo. In our ten hours with No Man’s Sky, we’ve not encountered a combat situation that made us want to devote resources, time, or inventory space to upgrades.

Ship combat works in a similar fashion. Your basic mining beam fires once before it needs to cooldown. Your machine gun works like a basic machine gun: shoot and don’t miss.

How’s space combat?

No Man's Sky - Space Combat

Like planetary combat, space combat is incredibly easy. Simply aim for a box right in front of an enemy ship and you’ll win most of the time. The only situations where we’ve lost were when we were swarmed by enemies after attacking a stationary freighter.

Can you meet other people?

No Man's Sky - Alone

At this time, it doesn’t appear as though encountering other players is in the game.

Can you freely fly to other planets or do you have to use the hyperdrive?

No Man's Sky - Pulse Jump

You’re free to fly to other planets with four speeds to choose from: basic, boost, Pulse Drive, and Hyper Drive. Your basic speed is the slowest. In most instances, we’ve found that travel from one planet to another can take at least an hour traveling at this speed.

While using boost, travel time is greatly reduced, although you might still be looking at a ten (or more) minute long journey. Because of this, we recommend always keeping your Pulse Drive topped up. This allows you to travel at a much faster speed, cutting the time it takes to get from where you are to where you need to be by about 80%. That said, this method of travel can only be used in space.

Can you call your ship from another side of the planet?

No Man's Sky - Ship Distance

In certain situations, yes. If you’re far away from your ship (the furthest we’ve bothered to venture is 30 mins away), you can find a shelter or trading outpost and hack a terminal to call your ship to you. Otherwise, you’ll need to follow the beacon on your HUD back to your ship.

Can you fly within the planet’s atmosphere?

No Man's Sky - Atmosphere

You’re free to fly within the planet’s atmosphere, although you can’t get too close to the ground or else the game leaves you hanging there like an invisible force is holding you in place.

Are takeoff and landing player-controlled or automatic?

No Man's Sky - Landing

For the most part, these are player-controlled. Once you hop in your ship, holding down the “accelerate” button (R2 on the DualShock 4) will lift your ship off the ground, and from there, you’re free to do whatever you please. Landing is done by pressing the landing button (square on the DualShock 4) after which your ship will land automatically.

Can you easily return to a previous planet?

No Man's Sky - Flying

Not necessarily. If you haven’t left that star system, then yes you can, but it might take a little while. Otherwise, it’s pretty much possible. However, if you have already embarked on a journey to another star system, you’re pretty much out of luck. Finding your way back to a previously-discovered star system is incredibly difficult.

How fun is it?

No Man's Sky - Accomplished

Well, that’s a question we’ll delve further into when we publish our written and video review in the future. For now, though, our answer is meh

Enderal mod for Skyrim is now available for download from the SureAI site and if you’re a fan of the general gameplay style of Skyrim, this mod is a must. It’s available completely free and is a total conversion mod, which means it uses Skyrim’s engine and some of its gameplay features to build an entirely new world with its own lore and story.

How does the mod play?

The world of Enderal is much more treacherous than the likes of Skyrim, due to some of the new mechanics introduced in the mod. You only regen health outside of combat if you’ve eaten food and only in combat if you swig a potion.

Unlike Skyrim, you won’t finish this game with tons of potions that you never use because the potions you find in dungeons are rancid and ineffective. If you want to be able to successfully manage your health while out and about, you’ll need to get familiar with the alchemy system.

Additionally, while the world of Skyrim was bleak and dreary much like the Nordic countries its landscapes attempt to mimic, the world in Enderal is varied. You’ll find grasslands, steamy jungles, a massive desert, and a beach near the ocean. There’s plenty of variety as you traverse more than 30 hours of content.

enderal-desert

What’s the story like?

The world of Enderal is a theocracy ruled by a caste of citizens who have set themselves up as gods. People in the world all follow their own caste, which are called Paths in the game. No one really steps outside of these Paths and it doesn’t feature the faction-based gameplay that most have come to expect from Skyrim.

The storyline is instead structured more like Mass Effect, in that it has a central questline players will follow, but there are available sidequests you can do to learn more about the world you’re playing in.

So why is it good?

enderal-main-city

For a fan mod that has been in development for years, the polish really shows. There are some rough edges in the tutorial area that may turn off some players, but once you get in the world proper, the quality of the environments feels very professional.

The voice acting is probably the best highlight of the mod, as some professional talent contributed their voices to the many characters you’ll encounter in the world.

People who felt Skyrim was too easy will find a lot to like about Enderal as well, as the world no longer levels as you do. Instead, quests will have a difficulty that you may need to level yourself up by doing other side quests before you can tackle the main challenge again. The resource management provides a real challenge as well since you’ll need to make sure you have enough potions before heading out to tackle those quests.

post-launch content, the inventory system needs to be reworked. Right now, you spend a lot of time in your inventory managing spaces for the things you carry. It helps that you can zap things back to your ship while you’re out and about, but getting new slots in the game is left up to chance.

You have to find triangle-shaped drop pods in order to upgrade your inventory, but the chance of encountering these is left up to the random generation of the planet. The planets are so large you’ll spend most of your time at the beginning of the game with a very small inventory unless you planet hop in order to find those pods as quickly as possible.

New technology is too random

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Finding new technology in No Man’s Sky is a frustrating experience because the new tech that you find to help you move toward smarter inventory management may not come in the first few facilities you break into. Because so much is left up to chance, the experience you have in the first few hours is largely dependent on your luck.

This leads to a frustrating experience that is hard to identify because of the procedural nature. It’s hard to pinpoint why someone loved or hated certain aspects of the game until they start describing their first few hours and you realize the person who doesn’t like the game too much had a pretty bad experience in those critical hours.

Still too many technical issues on PC & PS4

The PC version of the game is barely playable for most people. To Hello Games’ credit, they are working on an experimental patch to some of those issues, but the state of launch for the PC version really shows that most of the development time was spent with the PS4 version of the game. Which also has its fair share of problems.

The game needs to be made playable for those who have purchased the game as-is before any new content such as base-building or freight ownership is considered. I’m eager to see what content the team is working on, but these technical issues need to be a priority before extra development.

Download it and install to see if it works for you.
Fix 8: Try setting the NMS.exe file to High Priority in the Windows Task Manager. Some people are reporting this helps solve framerate problems not solved by any of the methods described above.
Fix 9: Try disabling the Steam Overlay. Some people are reporting that it can cause issues with the game stuttering.

The game keeps crashing!

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Unfortunately there’s not a lot you an do to fix this until Hello Games releases a patch for the game to address the issues in the first place. Despite that, some people are reporting marginal success in fixing their crashes by trying some of these fixes.

Fix 1: There’s an experimental patch available on Steam. To access it, right click on No Man’s Sky in Steam and select Properties. Then go to the beta tab and enter the code “3xperimental” without the quotation marks. This will let you select the experimental build from the drop down box so you can see if it works better for you than the currently live client.
Fix 2: Make sure your graphics drivers for your card are updated. This shouldn’t have to be said really, but you never know.

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The newest build of the GameFans app on the Google Play store now features notifications, so you can subscribe to the topics you want to follow. You can choose to follow subjects as broad as the entirety of PC gaming, or maybe you just want to receive updates about Destiny because you’re stoked about the Rise of Iron expansion.

Either way, we’ve got you covered. Anytime we publish a new piece of news in a topic that you’ve chosen to follow, you’ll receive a notification on your phone as soon as we publish the news. There’s no limit to the number of tags you can follow to receive notifications immediately, either!

So what are you waiting for? Our most requested feature from the GameFans app beta is now implemented, go download the GameFans app and tell us what you think! We’re working hard to build the best gaming news app so you’ll be on top of the news as it happens, no matter where you are.

No Man's Sky - Creature 2

Before leaving my planet, though, I did a little bit of soul searching. Ok, I wandered around aimlessly, but you get the point. My first discovery was new life. If I wanted to, I could’ve named the creature anything that I wanted, within reason. Things like profane words won’t slip by Hello Games’ censors. They thought abou that. After cataloging the creature in my book, I quickly took out my multi-tool and killed it.

I’m not exactly sure why I killed it. I guess it was an instinctive reaction, or I wanted to test out the Sentinels, the patrolling robots that prevent you from stripping the planet dry of its resources or killing off animals into extinction. However, after killing the beast, I was overwhelmed with a sense of sadness. I felt really bad about what I had just done. That’s something I’ve never felt while playing a game. I realized that, at that moment, I had no clue if there was more of it on my planet. I might’ve just killed off the last of its kind. My stomach lurched at this thought. Just a few seconds after this realization, I stumbled upon more of the same species. To make up for my gross act, I fed the creatures some minerals and went on my way. By the looks of things, they were pretty pleased.

After my rendezvous with the planet’s wildlife, I spent the rest of my time on this planet mining resources. Once I was done, I hopped in my ship and rocketed straight into the air. This was one of the most surprising things for me. Those moments in early trailers where the player would seamlessly go from planet to space? That actually works. I was taken aback by how easy all of it was. There weren’t any load times or waiting either. I just kept speeding forward and before I knew it, I was in the dark, cold nothingness that is space.

No Man's Sky - Planet

The first thing I did from here was turn my ship around to take a look at my planet. It was ginormous. I’d go as far as to say that it was about the size of the Earth. From my experience, that seems to ring true for most of the planet in No Man’s Sky. That’s not necessarily a good thing, though. I’ll explain why in a moment.

Once I was done marveling at the technical accomplishments of the game, I set off from my starter planet to a space station. I wanted to sell some goods to the locals.

Landing on one of the space stations for the first time actually scared me. Everything was quiet. The whole place seemed deserted and not knowing what to expect creeped me out. Was there going to be a hostile alien onboard? Would I have to fight my way back to my ship? Ultimately, there ended up being three or four doors I couldn’t open, so I guess I’ll never get the answer to that question.

No Man's Sky - Space Travel

Now, it was time to go to another planet. I saw what appeared to be a mostly water planet nearby. Actually, no, that’s not quite right. At normal speed, my radars indicated that it’d take an hour to get to the planet. No Man’s Sky is huge. However, I used a hyper speed to get there faster (although I should have just used my Pulse Drive to cut my time by around 80% but oh well).

Once I got to the planet, I looked around briefly, went to a depot to trade and sell some of my minerals. Again, I mined the place and set off to a new planet. The same thing happened at the next planet. If you’re noticing a pattern, you’re paying attention.

The most interesting thing I’ve done happened at my most recent planet: KO-35 (shout out to Power Rangers In Space fans). When I initially landed, I started going through the same motions again: look for a depot and go from there. The first depot I stumbled upon had two sentinels patrolling it. Surprise surprise, they are been alerted that I was hostile from my last skirmish on planet Hell. Or so I thought. In reality, KO-35 turned out to be a planet filled entirely with hostile sentinels. Just my luck. I quickly dispatched those two and ran into the depot before backup could come.

No Man's Sky - Abandoned Outpost

The depot was a mess. There were tentacles everywhere and a circle thing just sitting in the middle, begging to be touched. So I touched it. The thing informed me of something. My character said something and I hopped in my ship on the search for the next depot. I found it, rinse and repeat, until I went in to this depot. I paused just as the doors opened. This one was in the same condition. “What the hell?” was my initial reaction, followed by a slight tense feeling in my body. I felt like I was on the set of the original Alien movie and something was going to attack me.

I apprehensively made my way deeper into the depot, taking note of the now-open door to my left. As I crept toward the end of the hallway, I prepared myself to high-tail it out of there in case whatever was terrorizing this planet hadn’t finished with this depot.

The tentacles wrapped around the room, engulfing anything in their path. I was terrified, but hey, a box! Oh wait, no, I didn’t have any inventory space so I couldn’t get anything from the boxes. Go figure. Inventory management is a huge problem in No Man’s Sky. Oftentimes, I couldn’t grab a certain item because I was completely out of inventory space. There’s also a very annoying survival element, for some reason. On each planet are different weather conditions. You’re not a native to the planet, so the Exosuit you’re wearing takes care of any oxygen and general living things you need to survive. That means a constantly depleting meter that you have to refill with resources like Carbon and Plutonium. That also means a robotic voice repeatedly telling you when you’re low on energy. It’s annoying.

No Man's Sky Inventory

The inventory and meter management mini-game are huge factors preventing this game from being completely fbogThey bogg down the exploration. Instead of focusing on my discoveries on a new planet, I’m more concerned with how I’m going to make room to open a box that might not even have an item worth all that trouble.

As I walked toward the last box, something struck me from above. I reeled back and instinctively jabbed the right thumbstick on my DualShock 4 up, ready to blast that thing back to kingdom come, except I couldn’t use my multi-tool in here. Gah. Luckily, the thing was a stationary tentacle, seemingly protecting the box. I didn’t really care to approach it again, so I retraced my steps and emerged back on the surface of KO-35.

No Man's Sky - Combat

So yeah, something like that was interesting. There was a slight mystery and narrative to the moment. This brings to light another problem I have with No Man’s Sky: there’s no narrative.

I’ve seen the Three Paths patch notes, but what I haven’t seen is any sign of that in the game. There’s also nothing to indicate that going to the center of the galaxy/universe is your overall objective. Right now, the only thing I’ve done during my four hours with the game is go from planet to planet, mining resources. That’s it and frankly, I don’t think it’s that fun. Yeah, I’m still doing it for some cynical reason, but I’m not really enjoying myself too much.

Perhaps the biggest problem I have with No Man’s Sky is the promise of 18 quintillion planets, yet largely my planet-to-planet experience has been the same. Take those trailers from the early days of the game. They showed ginormous wildlife, quick travel to another planet, the most beautiful varied planets yet I haven’t seen any of that. It feels like my planets are just palette swaps of each other with sometimes aggressive drones.

At this point in my playthrough, I’m convinced that No Man’s Sky is boring. The survival elements keep the small fun elements from flourishing, but even those elements lose their spark after you realize you’re doing the same thing over and over again.